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Haas

The Haas rocket series, named after Austrian-Romanian medieval rocket pioneer Conrad Haas (1509-1579), ranges from a small orbital launcher able to put 40kg of payload to LEO, up to a heavy launcher able to put 60 tons of payload to LEO. The Haas rocket can be used as a stand alone SSTO rocket or in combination with the Launch Assist System that significantly increases the rocket's payload capability. The rocket has one stage that is fueled by hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. The payload will be placed in orbit together with a kick stage for further orbit corrections.

The Haas 2CA is the development base for the whole Haas rocket series.


 

 
Haas 2CA
Haas Mini
LAS 25R
Haas 3

Haas 3
LAS 500R

Super Haas
Super Haas
LAS 7000R
             
Payload to LEO (kg)
100
40
500
3,000
8,000
60,000
Cost/launch ($)
1,400,000
800,000
2,000,000
3,600,000
8,000,000
30,000,000
Cost/kg ($)
14,000
20,000
4,000
1,200
1,000
500

 

For more technical details, check the Launch Assist System White Paper.

 

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Cutting Edge Space Technology

The Haas 2CA rocket has an exceptional mass ratio of 29, with this number increasing for Haas 3 and Super Haas. This is made possible using composite materials and dense propellants. The Executor, a linear aerospike engine, is the most advanced rocket engine currently under development for orbital launchers. Because of its ability to auto adapt to the altitude pressure drop, it promises optimum performance at virtually all flight levels, allowing the use of up to 30% less fuel at low altitudes than any other rocket engine. This engine aims to keep construction costs low, without sacrificing the high performance. The thrust vectoring control is achieved by throttling the 16 combustion chambers (in the case of Haas 2CA), changing the individual chamber mixture ratio. This eliminates the heavy and complex gimbaling system for the engine. The whole vehicle is built from composite materials that offer low construction costs and very low weight.

 
 

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Orbital Flight Redefined

When the Haas 2CA rocket launches, it will be the first rocket in history to place itself entirely into orbit. This opens new frontiers for exploration of the Solar System as the rocket can be refueled in-orbit and re-utilize its aerospike engine, thus eliminating the need for additional upper stages. This rocket is extremely simple and, therefore, affordable to construct and operate. After the full qualification, the vehicle could be operated from inland spaceports as there are no stages that fall to the ground at burnout. It's intended to be the most responsive orbital launcher ever created, being able to reach orbit in less than 24 hours from the moment of launch decision. Working in conjunction with the Launch Assist System, the rocket will boost it's payload capabilities up to six times.

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Program Development

The Haas 2C SSTO project started in 2012, financed by private companies, being equipped with a liquid oxygen and kerosene turbopump fed system and with a “classic” bell-shape nozzle. The team encountered problems with the very low throttling ability of the liquid oxygen and kerosene combination with the turbopump-fed engine. At the US location we decided to incorporate new technologies, like the pressure-fed, multi-chamber, linear aerospike engine, and the use of the hydrogen peroxide and kerosene combination into the Haas 2CA SSTO. This allowed us to create an engine with a high throttleable range and an overall more cost-effective and efficient vehicle.

Since the successful development of the Launch Assist System, ARCA is committed to build an orbital launcher as clean as possible. For the first orbital flight, the Haas 2CA rocket weighting more than 16 tons at launch, will use the LAS 25R as first stage, reducing it’s polluting propellant mass from 16 to only 4 tons.

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The Haas 2CA Mini, that works in conjunction with LAS 25R, for payloads of 40kg to LEO.

Haas 2CA Mini + LAS 25R will serve also as a technology demonstrator for Haas 3 + LAS 500R and at a later date for Haas Heavy + LAS 7000R, although we aim to make this vehicle a viable candidate on the small satellites market.

The first flight of Haas 2CA Mini + LAS 25R should be expected for 2021, when we should also expect the start of commercial services for small payloads of 100kg to LEO.
The development of Haas 3 + LAS 500R with capabilities of 3000kg to LEO should start in 2022 with the first flight expected in 2024, followed by the launch of commercial services in 2024.
The start of construction of Haas Heavy + LAS 7000 should be expected in 2025 with the LAS 7000 VTOL flights performed in the same year and the complete vehicle first flight in 2027.

 

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Technology

IAR-111
HAAS 2B
ARCABOARD


Programs

HELEN
STABILO
DEMONSTRATOR 2B
EXOMARS

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